Wednesday, 1 July 2015

The Best In Craft....Stunning Painted Terracotta Pots

As we write this, the sun is shining its little heart out, the birds are singing and we feel summer has well and truly arrived. And where better to be than pottering around outside in this beautiful balmy heat.

We've rounded up some of the best painted plant pot ideas for you to look at, drool over and then, we hope, get out there and paint for yourselves!


Earthborn paints are ideal for this as you won't need to use a primer, meaning that you can get on with the fun bit of applying the stunning colours whenever the mood takes you. 


Although if you intend to use your pots outside, it's worth sealing the paint with a weatherproof finish, or try using Earthborn's Silicate Masonry Paint.


Taping off sections, or painting by hand gives a gorgeously graphic finish....

Try Earthborn Lido and Marbles for this two-tone treat...


...or Fresh Air and Gregory's Den if a muted finish is more your cup of tea...


We love this ombre effect. Within the seventy-two shades available, Earthborn have plenty of tonal variations to play with to make this look your own.


We're smitten by this next idea. Earthborn paints are absolutely 100% safe for children (certified as suitable for use on children's toys), meaning that there'll be no hidden nasties to worry about when applying the paint to your children's feet.


To create this upside down drip effect, first give your pot a coat or two of White, and then let Earthborn eggshell in Daisychain drip slowly down the sides.


Pick two of your Earthborn favourites, leaving the terracotta rims bare, for an instant summer display that will brighten up dull fences...


For summer holiday fun, get creative with your kids. How about these two adorable ideas for starters...


...or for something a little more adventurous, have another look at our pot-gilding ideas. Reading Room and Trilby would give a similar effect.


Earthborn Claypaint has an unbelievably matte finish and so is super-easy to write on, and acts as a good key for applying transfers....


Wouldn't this be a pretty outdoor display...


And now it's time for us to stop for this month and head outside into this glorious sunshine. Will you be joining us, paintbrush in one hand, plant pot in the other? Just don't forget the sunscreen!


Images ia Carolyn Roehm, webstagram, Earthborn, Relics of Witney, 2Modern, Cottage Living, Design Sponge, Kim's Kraziness, My Clever Nest, Surprise DIY, The Whoot, Relics of Witney, Nest Of Posies, Welke


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Monday, 1 June 2015

The Best Front Door Paint Colours

If you're anything like us, here at Relics of Witney, you won't be able to resist eyeing up beautiful front doors. Your head will be turned this way and that as you walk down a new street, being inspired, and squirrelling away ideas for the future.
 
Try Dulux Party Surprise 1
 
We all know that changing the colour of your front door is one of the simplest ways to make a dramatic change to the front of your house. 
 
Try Little Greene French Grey Dark
 
Choosing the right colour can instantly boost your kerb appeal, and, consequently, your house value. However, it's one thing to be bowled away by a particular shade you've spied but quite another to be able to confidently pin down a specific paint colour for your own front door.
 
Front Door - Mister David (47) http://www.littlegreene.com/mister-david
Little Greene Carys
 
Here's where we'd love to help you. Coming into Relics of Witney is a little like hiring your own designer, only it's free! Between us all, the Relics team has decades of experience helping our customers choose their perfect paints.
 
london front garden black and white victorian mosaic tile path yorkstone step
Try Little Greene Dark Lead Colour

 By giving us relevant information about your home, the way it faces, as an example, and the period it was built, we can help you put together a look that will perfectly suit the way you live.
 
Love this old boot rack by a family entrance
Try Farrow and Ball London Stone

 If, for instance, you live in a stone property, whose door is mostly in the shade, then we would steer you towards colours like Dulux Weathershield Green Stone from their Heritage range, which seems to radiate light, even from within the most gloomy of settings.
 
Post box, Cowbell and Outside Lights: www.Chalet-Shop.com Paint colours Dulux Heritage Stone Green
 
Or, if you feel that you would like your period home to have a slightly more contemporary feel, then we might suggest a harmonious shade to tie in with the brick or stone work, such as Dulux Weathershield Chalky Downs.
 
 
We've said it before but it's worth saying again (and again!) that Dulux Weathershield has absolutely fantastic staying power against all the varieties of weather. For your house exterior it's always worth choosing the very best exterior products to avoid needing to rectify peeling paint again in a couple of years. Using sub-standard paint is a complete false economy.
 
Farrow and Ball Pelt
 
Front door paint gets some of the highest traffic of your home, and is certainly the area that is most noticed. Take the time to get it right. The perfect front door paint should protect your door from the elements, withstand the elements and create a warm welcome for your guests.
 
Try Dulux Weathershield Fuschia Lily
 
 
 
Images via Pinterest, Voysey and Jones, Telegraph, Pinterest, Pinterest, unknown, Leopoldina Hayes, Farrow and Ball, unknown

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Friday, 1 May 2015

How To Choose Kitchen Paint Colours

When choosing paint colours for our kitchens, many of us simply don't have the option of painting our cabinets, nor do many of have beautiful wooden cabinets to paint!


If you're not prepared to put in a LOT of maintenance, painting melamine isn't the best way to go. It may look fabulous at first but with all the scrubbing and hard-knocks that kitchen doors inevitably take (let's be realistic!), they'll be peeling and flaky in no time at all.


Far better, if you've inherited a kitchen that must stay but needs an injection of character, is to give your space a kiss of character on the walls themselves.


With our extensive range of wipeable paint finishes, perfect for removing accumulating kitchen grime, Relics of Witney can offer you long-lasting peace of mind for a kitchen that will still look lovely in years to come.


So, where to start when choosing wall colours for your kitchen?
Here are a few, key pointers but for tailored advice to suit your needs, do contact the team at Relics. For more tips, take a look at Farrow and Ball's new booklet, available for our customers in store!


First of all, look at the design elements of your kitchen that can't be changed. Are they cool or warm? Choosing paint accordingly will make sure that your final choices will enhance, rather than distract from, your existing kitchen.


The brighter the room, the bolder you can be with your colour choice. If you've always yearned for deep and moody walls, kitchens, with plenty of white cabinets to blow away any traces of gloominess, are a good room to dip your toe into the dark side. Try Farrow and Ball Off Black.



On the other hand, if you have very low levels of natural light, perhaps because of an extension, don't be afraid to stick with neutrals. We have some really fabulous shades to choose from. Take a look at this kitchen with walls in Farrow and Ball Hardwick White...

Bathroom

Or this kitchen with walls painted in Farrow and Ball Mouse's Back, with woodwork in Pointing...


Consider tying in two or more paint colours to add depth and interest, such as in the kitchen below, which uses Farrow and Ball Pavilion Gray, Strong White and Cornforth White.

Bathroom

Finally, the right paint colour can and should counter any visual unbalance in your current kitchen. For example, orangey-warm wood can be toned right down by contrasting with muted colours, such as Farrow and Ball Blue Gray....


And our final piece of advice? Choose a colour that you LOVE! Paint fashions will come and go but kitchens are a room where you'll be spending a great deal of time. Let us help you get it right!


Our newsletter this month will help you think about tying in your door and window furniture. Have you signed up for yours yet?


Images via: Unknown, Weird combinations, apartment therapy, period living, sooz gordon, unknown, fresh home, g, Country Homes and Interiors, Farrow and Ball, Modern Country Style, homes-kid, Housetohome


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Wednesday, 1 April 2015

The Best Farrow and Ball Paint Colours For Kitchen Units

Probably one of the cheapest and most effective ways of transforming your kitchen is with judicious use of paint. But please let us emphasise the word judicious. Simply daubing your units with any old colour can be disastrous, giving you a poor finish and a room that ends up feeling dark and gloomy, rather than appearing spacious and stylish.


Yes, it's essential to take time over the colour. With years of experience, and many, many happy customers, the team at Relics of Witney can easily help to take the angst out of picking the right colours for your kitchen. Contact us or visit the shop in person, for a completely personal service.


For now, however, let us lead you through some stages of initial inspiration to get you well on the way to a transformed kitchen.


Firstly, find out the orientation of your kitchen. Farrow and Ball have produced a great booklet called 'All About Colour', available in Relics of Witney, which explains how the light that different rooms receives can greatly affect the appearance of paint.


For example, South-facing rooms are full of warm light for most of the day and, on sunny days, everything will look more yellow. Farrow and Ball suggest that it's worth emphasising that feeling of light and space with pale blue tones, such as Pavilion Blue or Borrowed Light, or use red-based neutrals, such as Joa's White, for a warmer feel.

Bathroom

Conversely, North-facing rooms can seem cooler and harsher with the lack of light. Farrow and Ball suggest that you focus on yellow-based colours, such as New White and Ringwold Ground to help bounce light around the room. 


Or, instead, try working with that natural lack of light and create an intimate, cosy room with dramatic choice of colour, such as Brinjal, a deep aubergine, or Down Pipe. a dark grey with a hint of teal.


The light in West- and East-facing rooms changes throughout the day as the sun swings over the sky. It's worth taking the time to think of when you'll use the room most to tailor your colour choice to the light you'll most often experience. If you want to use the room at a time when the light is very strong, you might like to pick a shade a little darker than you'd naturally be drawn to, as sunlight has a tendency to bleach out colour.


Secondly, work out the kind of artificial lighting you'll be using. Very warm lighting, such as incandescent bulbs, will cast a yellow glow, whilst LED lighting gives a bluish cast, meaning that your chosen paint may not appear as you'd first imagined it. 


Lastly, decide where you want your colour choices. The effect can be very different when painted on walls, compared to painted kitchen units. To demonstrate what we mean, here are two kitchens which both feature Farrow and Ball Elephant's Breath. The first has Elephant's Breath on the walls, and the second on the units.

Kitchenpainted units in Farrow and Ball Elephant's Breath

Farrow and Ball Elephant's Breath kitchen

We hope that's given you lots to think over. For help picking out paint colours that will work perfectly in your room, we'd love to hear from you.

Images via HousetoHome, Langham Painted Kitchens, housetohome, roomenvy, Farrow and Ball, Hamhigh, Farrow and Ball, Derbyshire life, Kate's Creative Space,  unknown, unknown


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